Sunday, October 16, 2011

Rules are made to be broken


I have always been one of those goody two-shoes who follows all the rules. It's not so much because I believe in the rules. It's more that I have this fear of getting caught, of rocking the boat, of somehow getting in trouble. I never once ditched school as a teen, because I was so afraid of getting caught.
Now that I am older, I still follow the rules, mostly. I show up when I say I'll be somewhere. I am an upstanding citizen--my speeding tendencies notwithstanding.
I knew when I had kids that my family would have rules. I would teach my kids to follow those rules, just as my parents taught me. In fact, I assumed most of my parents' rules would become mine once I had kids. For example, I always assumed my kids would eat what I made for dinner. No way would I be one of those schmucks who makes several meals, trying to please each of her kids.
No short order cook for me.
Yeah, the laugh's on me.
Now I have kids--kids with SPD--and many of my childhood rules just don't work for my family. I guess you could say my kids have taught me to loosen up and break the rules from time to time.
Check it out:
1) Don't wear pajamas in public.




PJs: they're not just for sleeping anymore!
Danny would live in his pajamas if he could.
2) No more monkeys jumping on the bed.




Jumping on the bed is a family sport. All in the name of getting in that good deep pressure.

3) No playing with your food.




Mmmm....tactile fun with butter!




Get it? Playing with your food? See, he's playing with canned food. Oh, alright, not as funny as I thought.
4) Avoid messes.






Mud. Mother Nature's perfect toy!
5) Sleep in your bed. Truth be told, I don't remember the last time my kids slept in their beds.






Beds are for suckers. Tents = way more fun, especially when chock full of blankets and stuffed animals.
6) No swinging, playing ball, riding a bike or roughhousing in the house. That includes trampoline jumping, of course!






Swings, glorious, swings! Our house is so popular with the neighborhood kids. And ever since we discovered my son has SPD, rough housing has become one of our favorite family pastimes.
7) No covering yourselves from head to toe in shaving cream. (Well, okay, I admit, this rule never occurred to me until after we had already broken it. But I assume most mothers, if given the choice, would outlaw the use of shaving cream in this manner, but what do they know, right?)



Who says Sensory Processing Disorder can't be fun?

How about you? What 'rules' get disregarded in your home for the sake of well-regulated senses?

6 comments:

Logical Libby said...

I see no problem with wearing pajamas outside. It's a little awkward when my husband won't talk to me, but c'est la vie.

Foxxy One said...

You've gotten all of mine. Yesterday Dylan wore long underwear tops and bottoms. The bottoms were a bit too much like underpants so I made him wear shorts on top. So he had on black long underwear with blue shorts. Some guy gave him the hairy eyeball and I said "what's wrong, never seen a real live superhero before?" hehehehe

Lizbeth said...

We've broken just about all of them including: why the floor makes a good table, how chalk isn't just for sidewalks and one meal for everyone, for dinner is for amateurs.

Mrsbear said...

Now that is a good time! I think you have to stay flexible if you want to maintain your sanity. I drive my oldest daughter to school in my PJs, 6:30 just seems too early to get dressed. Honestly we didn't have too many rules growing up, my grandparents were sticklers for water usage though. No bubble baths or frequent hand washing. lol

K- floortime lite mama said...

ADORE this post
looks like your kids are having a lot of fun and learning a lot too

Spectrummy Mummy said...

Rules are definitely meant to be broken! I had to smile because Pudding is in NO way a stickler for the rules, apart from nightwear. She will only wear her nightgown for bed, we even had to write it into the social story for the long plane ride. I get the impression that as long as it isn't *their* rule, it can, must and should be broken.